Music

General information:

Music is the language of sound, it exists in time and space. Perhaps the broadest definition of music is that it is organised sound (and silence!) Understanding music requires both the understanding of conventions and the challenging of them; ‘Works of Art make rules; rules do not make works of art’ Claude Debussy.

All activities in music lessons are designed to create or experience sound. This is achieved through almost exclusively practical tasks, being as true in year 7 as it is in year 13.

The journey between these two points is one of exploring how sound has been and can be organised in order to create an intended effect. Students demonstrate their understanding of this through integrated activities of listening performing and composing.

Learning is always approached through topics which attempt to cover a wide range of musical traditions genres and styles. In KS3 learning is always in whole class group or paired situations and though this is also true for KS4 and 5 there is an increasing emphasis on developing an individual musical voice as students progress through the school.

We have a newly refurbished and re-equipped, Music Department which boasts two orchestras, four choirs, concert band, rock bands, ukulele band and a fully functioning recording studio with control room, drum booth and large live room. We have a dedicated music technology control room running Cubase Pro 8.5 and Sibelius 5. This room is utilised by all year groups in music lessons.

Ensembles are directed by music staff but students are encouraged to lead and direct ensembles when there is a good match between ambition and ability!
  
A large number of girls receive lessons from visiting instrumental teachers: either privately employed by the department or from the Kent Music. Lessons take place on a rota basis during the school day, thus ensuring minimal disruption of their other subject studies. Students often reach high standards and some later pursue music as a career. All abilities are strongly encouraged to enjoy the rewards of playing an instrument. A large percentage of our A Level students go on to study music at university.
 
Concerts, recitals, musicals, competitions and cross curricular activities give focal points to our year and opportunities for students to perform in various venues and to various audiences. Workshops and concert tours are organised to enable students to adopt a wider appreciation and knowledge of the special, unique qualities of the subject. At all times the objective is to have fun and participate readily. The department is already becoming well known locally and has contributed to functions in the wider community such as the Tonbridge Carnival and the Sevenoaks Festival. The Choir and Swing Band have toured biennially and have performed in exciting places in recent years such as The Rhineland, Disney Land Paris, Venice, Prague, Barcelona, Vienna, Tuscany and Croatia.
 
Instruments Taught at the Weald of Kent include:
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Cornet, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Piano, Keyboard, Drum Kit, Voice, Recorder, Classical Guitar, Electric Guitar, Bass Guitar

Key Stage 3

Term

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

1

Using the musical elements to create mood, contrast and structure in music.
(Singing project)

Baroque Minuet
( Sibelius project)

Hip Hop
(Cubase Project)

2

American Folk Song
(Singing project)

Baroque Minuet (continued)

Hip Hop
(continued)

3

Pop Song conventions including drum kit patterns
( Singing and Cubase project

Northern India Classical Music.
( Instrumental project)

Reggae
( Instrumental project)

4

Rehearsing Year song and Pop song for concert( Singing  project)

Northern India Classical Music.                    (continued)

Reggae
(continued)

5

The Musical Clichés of action film music                                     (Instrumental project)

Chicago Blues
( Instrumental project)

Self-Directed Terminal Task (instrumental research of technology project)

6

The Musical Clichés of action film music
(continued)

Chicago Blues
(continued)

Self-Directed Terminal Task
(continued)

 

GCSE Music

Examination Board OCR

Course Components

Unit 1:                   Integrated Portfolio                        30%
This involves the Solo Performance on any instrument/voice and composition for your instrument or voice.

Unit 2:                   Practical Portfolio                            30%
This involves a group performance on any instrument/voice and composition. The composition is to a set brief.

Unit 3:                   Listening and Appraising               40%
Candidates will answer questions in a 1 ½ hour exam based on the knowledge and study music from the Areas of Study.  Questions will come from the study of a variety of styles form areas of study 2-5  outlined in the table below

General Information:

The GCSE course requires a great deal of self-organisation and motivation. Effectively 60% of the course is self-directed coursework. There is no requirement to read music but for some parts of the course it certainly helps. The main requirement is to enjoy music and a desire to understand how and why a wide range of music was composed.

Term

Year 10

Year 11

1

Film music

Continual work on solo performance and composition for integrated portfolio

The Concerto through time

Continual work on group performance and composition for practical portfolio

2

Film music

The Concerto through time

3

Conventions of pop

Finalising Integrated portfolio

4

Conventions of pop

Finalising practical portfolio

5

Rhythms of the world

Finalising practical portfolio

6

Rhythms of the world

 


A Level Music

Examination Board: OCR

Course Components

Composing Major

Performance A (01) 25% of A level
Recital Non-exam assessment – externally assessed via audio-visual recording. Minimum of 6 minutes and two contrasting pieces. Choice of:
• solo piece(s) on one or more instruments or voice
• ensemble performance (including accompanying)
• realisation using music technology

Composition A (03) 35% of A level
Compositions accompanied by a score, lead sheet or written description Non-exam assessment – externally assessed via audio recordings. Compositions with a combined duration of at least 8 minutes• One to a brief set by OCR • One to a brief written by the learner • Three short technical exercises

OR


Performing Major

Performance B (01) 35% of A level
Recital Non-exam assessment – externally assessed via audio-visual recording. Minimum of 10 minutes and two contrasting pieces. Choice of:
• solo piece(s) on one or more instruments or voice
• ensemble performance (including accompanying)
• realisation using music technology Section 1: Free Choice Section 2: Focused Study

Composition B (04) 25% of A level
Compositions accompanied by a score, lead sheet or written description Non-exam assessment – externally assessed via audio recordings. Compositions with a combined duration of at least 4 minutes
• One to a brief set by OCR
• One to a brief written by the learner

Listening and appraising (05) All Students
40% of A level
Written exam including aural extracts. 2 hour and 30 minutes written exam.
• Analysing and evaluating music
• Familiar and unfamiliar pieces
• Prescribed works
• Questions based on aural extracts.
Students have to follow 4 areas of study, two are compulsory
Area of Study 1: Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven
Area of Study 2: Popular Song: Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band
and a further two have to be chosen from
Area of Study 3: Developments in Instrumental Jazz 1910 to the present day
Area of Study 4: Religious Music of the Baroque Period
Area of Study 5: Programme Music 1820–1910
Area of Study 6: Innovations in Music 1900 to the present day

General Information

The A level course requires a great deal of self-organisation and motivation. Effectively 60% of the course is self-directed coursework. There is no requirement to read music but for some parts of the course it certainly helps. The main requirement is to enjoy music and a desire to understand how and why a wide range of music was composed. Which Areas of study that are followed and the order in which they are addressed will be done in consultation with the students at the start of the course, to ensure that the course fits the needs and strengths of the students on the course. In year 13 students may follow particular preferences of area of study independently. Accordingly, this is very much a learnt course with tutorials being the main method of lesson delivery.

Term

Year 12

Year 13

1

Popular Song: Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band

Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven

Continual work on performance and composition

Optional Area of Study A

Optional Area of Study B

Continual work on performance and composition

2

Popular Song: Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band

Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven

Optional Area of Study A

Optional Area of Study B

3

Popular Song: Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band

Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven

Preparation for Recital

Realisation of composition Work

4

Popular Song: Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band

Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven

Performance or Recital

Realisation of composition Work

5

Optional Area of Study A

Optional Area of Study B

Revision of Course

Revision of Course

6

Optional Area of Study A

Optional Area of Study B

 


 

 

 

Latest News

Previous Next