Religious Education

RE KS3 Outline

General Information:

Religious beliefs and attitudes provide the motivation for the vast majority of the thoughts and actions of people across the world. In studying the reasons behind these thoughts and actions, students can come to a deeper understanding of the world around them. Key Stage 3 offers a chance of exposure to wide-ranging worldviews and belief systems, along with a myriad of different cultures and societies. Students consider the role of Christianity in modern Britain and are introduced to some important theological concepts, along with taking a tour of the world’s major religions. Broader issues concerning ethics and the existence of evil in the world are also studied, with religious and non-religious views considered. The focus is on a different BIG question each term, with students given the time to consider not only what they can learn about religious people and beliefs, but what they can learn from them. Students are encouraged to consider their own views and justify them, building empathy for the views of others as they go.

Term

Year 7

Year 8

1

What does it mean to be Christian?

Where is God?(Pilgrimage)

2

What does it mean to be Jewish?

Can one person make a difference?

3

Who is/was Jesus?

What does it mean to be Sikh?

4

Why did Jesus have to die?

What does it mean to be Hindu?

5

What does it mean to be human?

How do we define religion? (Buddhism)

6

How do we treat others?

Project based learning: Islam


RE KS4 Outline
Examination board: Edexcel Religious Studies B

Course Components

Paper one: Religion and Ethics through a study of Christianity. Written Exam, 1 hour and 45 minutes, worth 102 marks and 50% of GCSE.

Paper two: Religion, Peace and Conflict through a study of Islam. Written Exam, 1 hour and 45 minutes, worth 102 marks and 50% of GCSE.

 

General information:

This curriculum is designed to reflect the demands of a truly modern and evolving religious studies environment. It focuses on Christianity and Islam as two British religions. Both are studied within the context of wider British society, and the course aims to give a deep understanding of the motivations and actions of religious believers. It also gives students the opportunity to consider for themselves life’s important issues of Ethics and Philosophy, from the ethical debates surround abortion and euthanasia, our treatment of the environment and theories of punishment, to the role of women in society and religion, ideas about life after death and arguments for and against the existence of God. Debate and critical analysis of religious views is encouraged, and religious attitudes are evaluated along with non-religious worldviews such as Humanism.

Students will develop skills in critical thought, evaluation, extended writing and empathy as they get to grips with the principles underlying religious thought and action in the modern world. They will also critically consider their own worldview and develop the language and explanatory skills to justify their opinions.

Term Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
1 Christian beliefs Matters of life and death Living the Muslim life
2 Christian beliefs Matters of life and death Living the Muslim life
3 Marriage & the family Muslim beliefs Peace & Conflict
4 Marriage & the family Muslim beliefs Peace & Conflict
5 Living the Christian life Crime & Punishment Exam
6 Living the Christian life Crime & Punishment  

A Level Religious Studies

Exam board: Edexcel

Course components:
Paper one: Religion and Ethics. Written Exam, 2 hours, worth 80 marks and 33.3% of the A level
Paper two: Philosophy of Religion. Written Exam, 2 hours, worth 80 marks and 33.3% of the A level
Paper three: New Testament Studies. Written Exam, 2 hours, worth 80 marks and 33.3% of the A level

General information:

This course offers wide-ranging, challenging study of Philosophy and religion. The Ethics and Philosophy components mix a study of historical and scholarly schools of thought with a critical analysis of modern developments. Ethical theories are applied to real world issues society faces today, and philosophical arguments about religion are evaluated, giving students the skills to comprehensively critique the views of others and justify their own views. The New Testament section of the course offers an in-depth insight into the presentation and interpretation of the life and teachings of Jesus, along with a comprehensive overview of the way the New Testament was put together, and the purposes behind its writings. The text is placed firmly in context and scholarly views are interpreted and evaluated.

Through a mix of short answers and extended essay writing, students develop a wide range of skills in textual interpretation, analytical thought, evaluation and justification of arguments. They also come to a deep understanding of what humanity has had to say about life’s biggest questions, and how religious literature has shaped the world as we know it.

Term

Year 12

Year 13

1

Ethics: Three ethical theories
Philosophy: Arguments for the existence of God
New Testament: N/A

Ethics: Ethical language
Philosophy: Religious language
New Testament: N/A

2

Ethics: N/A
Philosophy: Arguments for the existence of God
New Testament: Background to  Jesus’ life, teachings about Jesus

Ethics: N/A
Philosophy: Works of scholars
New Testament: Ways of interpreting scripture

3

Ethics: Environmental issues & Equality
Philosophy: Religious experience
New Testament: Teachings about Jesus

Ethics: Deontology & Virtue Ethics
Philosophy: Life after death
New Testament: Kingdom of God, Conflict in the gospels, Crucifixion & resurrection

4

Ethics: War & Peace, Sexual Ethics
Philosophy: Religious experience
New Testament: N/A

Ethics: Medical ethics
Philosophy: Life after death
New Testament: Crucifixion & resurrection

5

Ethics: War & Peace, Sexual Ethics
Philosophy: The problem of evil
New Testament: Interpreting the New Testament

Exams

6

Ethics: N/A
Philosophy: Religious language
New Testament: Interpreting the New Testament

 

 

 

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